THUG Life

THUG

I shouldn’t have come to this party.

Regular readers of TTW know that I usually stay away from books that have hype surrounding their launch as I like the headspace to make my own mind up about them. But there was something about The Hate U Give that made me desperate to read it and now, having done so, I can say that the hype is justified. This book is important, relevant and heart-achingly good. Everyone should pick up a copy.

Starr Carter lives two lives – balancing her posh co-ed high school in the suburbs with her home life in one of the poorer neighbourhoods, the place where she was born and raised. She’s managing to keep the two successfully apart but one evening and one tragic incident will soon bring those walls that divide her lives crashing down and she has to decide to find her voice before she’s silenced…

Thomas’ debut novel is fearless. Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, it is both affecting and effective, drawing you deep into the heart of Starr’s world. It explores the fear, generosity, anger and loyalty a girl, family and community feel when it is threatened by injustice. It examines prejudice at every angle – from a figure of authority’s assumption of behaviour based on race to the issues surrounding couples of different ethnic backgrounds. At its heart, it is the tale of a sixteen year-old who witnesses the shooting of her friend but THUG actually explores much more about the world than we’d readily admit.

Unlike the central incident of the book, THUG is actually an incredibly balanced novel. It examines white privilege just as readily as it explores the problem of gang warfare. It is not anti-white or pro-black but rather calls for universal humanity, justice and consequence. It is as much a social and political commentary as it is a gripping and powerful narrative.

Starr is a wonderfully generous protagonist. She is unfiltered but neutral, seeing all sides of life at school, home and in her neighbourhood. I loved the complexity and honesty that Thomas captures in Starr – she is the only witness to the shooting of her childhood friend, Khalil, by a police officer and has to navigate the guilt, anger and injustice that begin to stand alongside her grief. Somehow she is able to find courage and conviction to go against the accepted authority and fight for what is right. She is an awesome and inspiring protagonist that you’ll root for time and again.

The Hate U Give brings today’s racial tensions and the issues associated with it to light in much in the same way Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird did. It’s just a shame that such a powerful book is still needed today. A fantastic and phenomenally successful novel, The Hate U Give is a book well worthy of its praise. Read it.

5 star

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