Debut Authors – What Tolkien Did Next…

Now I have explored the debut novel of J.R.R Tolkien, it’s time to go a little further through the wardrobe to unearth what he did post-Hobbit

Tolkien

Author: John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (1892–1973)

Debut novel: The Hobbit (1937)

Age of author when debut published: 45

140 character review: Surprisingly accessible and highly original fantasy quest with timeless characters, a satisfying ending and superb writing. (Original review posted here – 4 stars)

Favourite quote from debut: “Then something Tookish woke up inside him, and he wished to go and see the great mountains, and hear the pine-trees and the waterfalls, and explore the caves, and wear a sword instead of a walking-stick.”

Reception of debut: Upon its publication, The Hobbit received astoundingly good reviews from both UK and US based critics with WH Auden describing the tale of the little hobbit as “one of the best children’s stories of this century”. It was nominated for the Carnegie Medal (though missed out to Noel Streatfeild) and has held a firm position on every recommended children’s reading list ever since.  So well was The Hobbit received that Tolkien was immediately asked for further material from his publisher – and so came The Lord of the Rings trilogy.

Other notable works:

The Fellowship of the Ring (1954)

The Two Towers  (1954)

The Return of the King (1955)

The Adventures of Tom Bombadil (1962)

Letters From Father Christmas (1976)

The Silmarillion (1977)

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One thought on “Debut Authors – What Tolkien Did Next…

  1. Pingback: Revisiting A Little Hobbit | Through The Wardrobe

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